My mom requested that we eat in small little shops or eatery or those traditional japanese restaurant instead of modern ones. She believed those hidden gems were underrated.

My parents feel more reassured when an old japanese chef, same their age or older was serving or preparing their food. That’s because they miss the old times. At times, I couldn’t understand how they always tell me the food was so good in the old times. My age is really so far from their age actually. My dad, age 70 was a post-world war veteran, while my mom, age 64 was a retired soldier and police officer like my dad. They appreciate small, humble, traditional eateries like these.

True enough! I never look at Wagyu the same way.

Just to share,I got disappointed with Wagyu we bought from the Philippines. The first one was the famous wagyu cubes. It was tasty from the outside but there were fillers, and preservatives on the inside. We didn’t fry with added oil, instead we let the oil of the wagyu cube do its magic, but it was a disaster it was super oily and it leaves an aftertaste. The second was Wagyu dish from a korean restaurant. The beef itself taste nothing and the wagyu taste remained in the sauce. Not authentic at all.

But this Wagyu in this Japanese eatery is love. It is the middle of tender and chewy. Just right for us to chew our food slowly and surprise our palate with every burst of juicyness and wagyu flavor on the beef itself.

This shrimp, egg and rice dish is my dad’s choice. We couldn’t count how many times he requested for Katsudon dish. Either Katsudon or Unagi is my dad’s pick. Wohoo, we’re finally on the same list of food favorites.

The dish per meal cost more or less 2,000-3,000 yen or 1000-1,500 pesos if I remembered correctly. For the price, how I wish the wagyu beef got more pieces in our plate. Nevertheless, we enjoy our wagyu experience in this quaint restaurant in Kyoto.

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